In Their Own League Advent Countdown: 2. Doubt

By Morgan Roberts The 2008 film “Doubt” is a Christmas movie.  I know what you’re saying to yourself, “That’s a bit of a stretch, Morgan” or “Morgan, that’s super dark.” or “Um, Morgan, are you in therapy???” But hear me out!  “Doubt” is brilliantly a Christmas movie because it shows the complexity of the religion and the institution celebrating this holiday. Christmas is not merely … Continue reading In Their Own League Advent Countdown: 2. Doubt

In Their Own League Advent Countdown: 1. The Thin Man (1934)

By Joan Amenn Mr. and Mrs. Charles (William Powell, Myrna Loy) have just arrived in New York City for the holiday season and they are ready to party! However, there seems to have been a murder committed and Nick Charles is called out of retirement to solve it, mostly to amuse his wife. Noir, comedy and season’s greetings all mix uniquely in “The Thin Man” … Continue reading In Their Own League Advent Countdown: 1. The Thin Man (1934)

The women in “Elf” are just props – but I still love it

Let me make it clear up front that I really like “Elf” (2003) and no Christmas is complete without it. It’s consistently ranked among the top Christmas films of all time and is screened at cinemas every year.

With that in mind, I want to talk about the way the film treats women. Continue reading The women in “Elf” are just props – but I still love it

Review: Black Christmas (2019)

To say that “Black Christmas” is the movie society needs to take note of is a massive understatement. Directed by Sopia Takal and written by herself and April Wolfe, “Black Christmas” is a modern updating of the 1974 classic. Whereas most remakes and reboots take the safe and give us what we as an audience expect, this 2019 update is at once a loving tribute to the original but also pushes it into scary and very real directions.

Lead by a standout performance by Imogen Poots as Riley Stone, “Black Christmas” has themes that are sure to resonate with young women. Riley, herself a victim of a sexual assault, is forced throughout to constantly face her abuser and the ramifications of her speaking out against him. Continue reading Review: Black Christmas (2019)