Retrospective Review: Thursday Till Sunday

“Thursday Till Sunday” (De jueves a domingo) (2012) by Chilean director Dominga Sotomayor Castillo plays with perspective and camera work to create an immersive yet sensitive coming of age drama. "Thursday Till Sunday" won the Tiger Award at Rotterdam Film Festival, and the award for best cinematography at Toronto International Film Festival. 10-year old Lucia (Santi Ahumada) and her family embark on a four day holiday with both Lucia and her younger brother Manuel (Emiliano Freifel) riding in the back seat of the car. Across the four days a happy family break slowly turns into a childhood-defining realisation that her parents may be splitting up.

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31 Days of Horror, Day 3: Revenge

The sub-genre of “rape-revenge” movies has often proved to be an uncomfortable viewing experience. A staple of Grindhouse and horror, it has the potential to present the empowerment of a victim over her (and it always is a her) attackers. Yet all too often such films explicitly linger on the cruelty and assault, throwing in nudity which seems designed to titillate rather than bring sympathy and aimed to appeal towards the desires of a male audience. With Coralie Fargeats “Revenge” (2018) a balance is addressed, which reclaims the tropes of the genre to offer a bloody and gory empowering female perspective.

LFF 2019: A Celeberation Of Female Filmmakers

This upcoming Wednesday, (2nd October), is when this year's LFF (London Film Festival) will be starting. Yours truly will be attending for a few days and doing her best to cram as many films as possible. This year's festival is quite remarkable in the fact that 60% of films which have been selected for the competition have been directed or co-directed by a female. This is a great achievement for female representation in the industry, especially when we recall how this year's Venice Film Festival only two films in competition were from a female filmmaker.

Review: I Used to Be Normal: A Boy Band Fangirl Story

From sports to comic books, fandom has become a pivotal part of pop culture and for some people it’s an integral part of their daily lives. However, no fandom has transcended through generations more rapidly and with greater force than that of Boy Band fandom. Since The Beatles hit the music scene back in the 60s, fangirls have come from near and far to simply just be in presence of their favorite boy bands and have gone so far as to make them a part of their who they are as a person. Normally, most girls are told that this is a phase in their lives and that when they’re older they’ll look back and think that they were just immature – but is this really true. Well, this is what Australian filmmaker Jessica Leski uncovers in her new documentary “I Used to Be Normal: A Boyband Fangirl Story,” and the result is a very engrossing film that expertly covers the positive and negative effects boy band fandom can have and the roles they’ve played in women’s lives for generations.

Why We Shouldn’t Overlook Bride And Prejudice

In August, Gurinder Chadha’s latest film “Blinded by the Light” (2019) was released. It tells the story of a young Pakistani man in England who finds his voice through Bruce Springsteen’s music despite struggling with discrimination. It’s hardly the first time that Chadha has explored the theme of cultural inclusion, exclusion, and immigration. Chadha herself is an Indian woman raised in England so she brings her personal experiences to the films she writes and directs, including her most famous “Bend It Like Beckham” (2002). The release of her latest film seems like a good time to revisit one of her earlier works, “Bride and Prejudice” (2004), which often doesn’t get the credit it deserves.

John Hughes Resurrected

My obsession with John Hughes started from a very young age. Growing up in the same town he lived in, Lake Forest, Illinois, made me feel like I was living inside one of his films, and I could relate. I always felt uncomfortable growing up, similar to the way most Hughes characters do, there was always something about them that was different from the other kids, something real.

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