ITOL Top 50 Films of the Decade, Entry No. 45: Certain Women

Year: 2016 Runtime: 107 Minutes Director: Kelly Reichardt Writer: Kelly Reichardt Stars: Michelle Williams, Kristen Stewart, Laura Dern, Lily Gladstone Certain Women: A Woman's Lonely and Honest Landscape By Ariana Martinez Films that progress slowly and with gentle telling are not something most audiences are accustomed to but must allow themselves to experience. "Certain Women"... Continue Reading →

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Spotlight: Zoey Deutch

Every year, we are introduced to a handful of young actresses between the ages of about twenty and twenty-five. Brie Larson. Jennifer Lawrence. Emma Stone. Kristen Stewart. The list goes on and on. Each of the women mentioned above have impressive resumes. Their work rightfully has solidified them for further career success.

31 Days of Horror, Day 27: The Slumber Party Massacre Series

Slasher films have always been thought of as films that simply exist to rack up a body count and not much more. I’ve never agreed with that notion. There are multiple slasher films that have more going on underneath the surface. "The Slumber Party Massacre" series is no different. You could even say that there is more going on in these films than in most other slashers. Today I’m going to talk about how "The Slumber Party Massacre" series has much more to say about sexuality than it does about violence.

31 Days of Horror, Day 25: American Mary

“American Mary” (2012) is a criminally underrated dark comedy and horror film directed by Jen and Sylvia Soska. Due to its subject matter and gore, it was not widely released. It was released to V.O.D. and DVD quickly, though, helping the film amass a cult following. “American Mary” is often left out in discussions about women in horror. It’s overshadowed by more popular cult classics like “Jennifer’s Body” and “The Descent”  — both of which are vital to discussions about women in horror — but it’s a mistake to ignore “American Mary.” The film is disgusting, cathartic and creative. It deserves to be ranked amongst the best body horror and rape revenge films of the past decade.

Female Filmmaker Friday: Jodie Foster as Director

As hard as it is to believe, Jodie Foster allegedly once said, "Acting, for me, is exhausting. I’m more energized by directing. It’s more intense to direct. I can pop in and express myself, then pop out again. It’s a huge passion for me." So why hasn’t she directed as much as she might have?

Nice is the New Summer Scare

The problem can’t be solved if it can’t be found, and this summer, we found some problems lurking in soft-spoken packages. “Midsommar” (2019) takes familial and romantic trauma and moves it outside, into the light of the unceasing Swedish sun; “Ready or Not” (2019) takes a bright new beginning inside, into the cloistered, candle-lit mansion. Over the course of each film, our final girls find the true nemesis is not within themselves, but without: their lives have taken an unexpected turn because of the men who are closest to them. How could these guys ever hurt anyone? They have the best intentions, and they never mean any harm! They’re nice guys!

31 Days of Horror, Day 8: A Girl Walks Home Alone At Night

One would think that vampires are a trope in horror that has been beaten to death with a clove of garlic. However, Ana Lily Amirpour's "A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night" not only breathes live into this overdone trope but also gives the classic monster a feminist twist that is both innovative and empowering. Style-wise, the film filled to the brim with moody, cinematography which contributes greatly to the dark, tense vibe that consumes the narrative in a "Sin-City" (2005) meets "Cat People" (1942) vibe. Described as the 'first Iranian Vampire Western', the film (written and directed by Amirpour) follows a lonely vampire that roams Bad City, a crime-filled ghost town whose residences are unaware that a bloodthirsty beast lives among them. However, the vampire known only as 'The Girl' (Sheila Vand) is certainly not the only monster that lurks in the shadows.

Review: Riot Girls

Post-apocalyptic settings have become quite common in films and tv series and they appear to be here to stay. The reason for this is pretty much anything goes when you’re working within that genre as long as you can come up with something to grab the viewer’s attention. “Riot Girls” (2019) falls into that sci-fi, alternate history, post-disaster category.

Contributors wanted

Interested? Please send an email to intheirownleague@gmail.com. Please see below what content we are seeking. (Please note that this is a non-paid role). Article length: 700-1000 words (commitment 1 article every month). Articles can focus on spotlights on female talent working in the industry, analysis of film in depth, reflective piece on current topic or... Continue Reading →

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