Review: DC Universe’s Stargirl Premiere

Now, DC Universe adds another show to its arsenal with a colourful and youthful rise of a new heroine in “Stargirl” and is already showing its potential to be something really special.

Now, before we get into anything with our titular heroine, I have to say that this opening is absolutely fantastic and presents a unique look to the DC Universe as it delves in a lesser-known team – The Justice League Society of America Continue reading Review: DC Universe’s Stargirl Premiere

Exclusive Interview With Director Amy Adrion About “Half the Picture”

“Do you want to watch this with me?”  I am home for the holidays and my mom, a movie-buff, is gearing up to watch the documentary film, “Half the Picture” (2018).  “Half the Picture” looks at female filmmakers, their stories, their films, and more importantly, giving them the space to talk about the hurdles they have had to climb throughout their careers.  The filmmakers each had unique hurdles for their films, but the blatant gender inequality experienced was universal.  Thanks Mom for introducing me to this film.

“Half the Picture” was directed by female filmmaker, Amy Adrion. Adrion’s film perfectly balances the valiant victories and the lowest lows.  It is an intimate look at women in different stages of their careers, all with a plethora of film credits.  It ponders if the current conversations in film will lead to a paradigm shift or if this is simply a brief respite from systemic discrimination.  Will the current atmosphere lead to the change film and TV need?  It is an inspiring, and at times frustrating, film.  So much has been done, yet there remains so much to do. Continue reading Exclusive Interview With Director Amy Adrion About “Half the Picture”

Social Isolation Review: “Unbelievable”

People have always been fascinated with true crime.  But since the rise of the Internet and creation of the “Law & Order” television franchise, the space to indulge in true crime has expanded exponentially.  

But if we talk about and consider watching true crime during this time, the one series we should be focusing on is Netflix’s “Unbelievable.”  It is not an easy watch, and personally I have had to talk a number of people into watching past episode one.

The series follows Marie (a superb Kaitlyn Dever) who is trying to start out on her own following years in the foster care system. But her attempts to build a new life are demolished following a home invasion and rape. Continue reading Social Isolation Review: “Unbelievable”

Why I (Still) Love Lucy

I remember the first time I saw an episode of “I Love Lucy”. As a 90’s baby, I watched Nick at Nite religiously. For anyone who was not born in the glory of the nineties, Nick at Nite was a cable program on Nickelodeon. Long after my bed time, Nick at Nite would play re-runs of old television shows like “I Love Lucy”, “Bewitched”, and “I Dream of Jeannie”. Instead of being annoyed by the lack of color I remember being fascinated watching the black and white shows.

My absolute favorite show on Nick at Nite was I Love Lucy. The first episode I vividly remember watching was one of the most classic episodes, “Lucy Does a TV Commercial”. Lucy advertises a medicine called “Vitameatavegamin” that unbeknownst to her contains 23% alcohol. My tiny ten-year-old self roared with laughter as Lucy got drunk off of the medicine and fudged all of her lines. “Do you pop out at parties? Are you unpoopular? The answer to all your problems is in this little ottle.” If you haven’t seen this episode, run and watch it immediately. It perfectly illustrates the genius of “I Love Lucy”. Continue reading Why I (Still) Love Lucy

Social Isolation Review: “Sharp Objects”

Want to feel deeply anxious and maybe a little depressed?  Look no further than HBO’s miniseries “Sharp Objects.” Amy Adams stars as crime reporter Camille Preaker.  Camille comes back to her small Missouri hometown after a second teenage girl is found murdered.

But coming home comes with more than just trying to cover and solve the murders of two young girls.  Camille is once again with her mother, Adora (Patricia Clarkson) and spending time with her younger half-sister Amma (Eliza Scanlen).  While she sorts through her past and her relationship with her family, she also tries working in tandem with Detective Richard Willis (Chris Messina) who has been called in from Kansas City to help with the investigation. Continue reading Social Isolation Review: “Sharp Objects”

Social Isolation Review: “Russian Doll”

What would you do if you had to relive the same night, over and over again, dying in a new way each time? Oh, and what if that day is your 36th birthday?

That is where Nadia (Natasha Lyonne) finds herself.  This existentially dark, “Groundhog’s Day”-esque show takes us down a path of self-discovery, alternate timelines, and redemption.  I won’t give too much away. “Russian Doll” is a particularly special show, and to ruin the magic of a first time watch would be criminal.  So, you’re just going to have to trust me that it is worth going down the rabbit hole for this one.

“Russian Doll” hinges upon Lyonne’s performance.  She does not disappoint. Continue reading Social Isolation Review: “Russian Doll”

Social Isolation Review: “Fleabag”

This is a love story.

“Fleabag,” Phoebe Waller-Bridge’s award-winning series, is a masterpiece.  I do not say that lightly. But it is true.  

Fleabag (Waller-Bridge) is a quirky, sometimes crude woman attempting to live her life.  Season 1 introduces us to her life, her family, her friends. She is a mess. Her life is a mess,  Her mother has passed and now her father (Bill Paterson) is dating her Godmother (Olivia Colman).  She has a strenuous relationship with her sister, Claire (Sian Clifford).  And her best friend Boo (Jenny Rainsford) has died.  Continue reading Social Isolation Review: “Fleabag”

The “Schitt’s Creek” Legacy

ong-running shows leave their marks on television.  “Schitt’s Creek” has been no exception. With its conclusion, here is a quick look at its legacy.

“Schitt’s Creek” gave us a tiny town with a host of characters.  This little oasis in the world far away from the “phobias” of the world.  The town of Schitt’s Creek is inclusive to the LGBTQ community. When David Rose (Daniel Levy) came out as pansexual, his parents Johnny and Moira (Eugene Levy and Catherine O’Hara) were very accepting.  The town was also unbothered by his sexual orientation. Continue reading The “Schitt’s Creek” Legacy

Spotlight: Alexis Rose

There are few characters on television that over the course of a series go through a major transformation and character development.  “Schitt’s Creek” character Alexis Rose is one of those.

When introduced in Season One, Alexis is a vapid rich young woman who has never had to struggle or work for anything.  That is until her family loses their entire fortune and are forced to move to the only asset they have: a tiny town called Schitt’s Creek. Continue reading Spotlight: Alexis Rose