A Sort of ‘Review’ of Dollhouse: The Eradication of Female Subjectivity from American Popular Culture

After watching “Dollhouse” I was left feeling that the film was simply an excuse for Brending to express her personal grudges against the trans community. I’m not sure whether this film will hinder her career or not especially considering the current climate. However, the simple fact that it’s been made and screened at Slamdance film festival proves she’s not being oppressed. Her voice is being given a platform. How many trans filmmakers have been able to get their films made and screened at Slamdance, I wonder? Continue reading A Sort of ‘Review’ of Dollhouse: The Eradication of Female Subjectivity from American Popular Culture

The Terror of TERFs Revealed in “Midsommar’s” Summertime Setting

The last scenes of Ari Aster’s premier horror masterpiece “Hereditary” (2018) take viewers through a winding middle-American manor, with dysfunctional family dynamics incarnated as demons in the eerie night-time environment. Aster abandons this classic horror imagery for a more subversive setting in “Midsommar” (2019), where his familiar formula of manifesting the characters’ resentments towards one another as violent retribution instead takes place in the long-lasting daylight of a secluded, Scandinavian commune. Continue reading The Terror of TERFs Revealed in “Midsommar’s” Summertime Setting

Review: John Lewis: Good Trouble

The United States feels like it’s at another turning point in its social history. Rebelling against injustice and protesting for change are things built into its core. There could not be a more perfect time for a documentary like Dawn Porter’s “John Lewis: Good Trouble” (2020) to be released. For those unfamiliar with John Lewis, he’s a Congressman representing the state of Georgia, who is well known for his history of non-violent activism during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s and his particular dedication to voting rights. Continue reading Review: John Lewis: Good Trouble

Sheffield Doc Fest Exclusive Review: Judy Versus Capitalism

Just who is Judy Rebick? Well, it’s a complicated question to ask. Judy is a proud second-wave feminist from Canada, and has been an activist for women’s rights for over five decades. She’s the woman who saved abortionist Dr. Henry Morgentaler from being stabbed. She’s from a Jewish family but she’s a campaigner to free Palenstine. She’s the survivor of abuse, an eating disorder, and other mental health issues. And, she fights against the corruption of Capitalism. However, she’s fighting against so much more and she’s been fighting all her life. Judy is a lot of things, but mostly she’s just herself. Continue reading Sheffield Doc Fest Exclusive Review: Judy Versus Capitalism

Sheffield Doc Fest Exclusive Review: Mother-Child (Niña mamá)

Shot in black and white, “Mother-Child” is beautifully stark and honest. There are no fancy, dramatic camera angles. Instead, cinematographer Gustavo Schiaffino, makes the decisions to shoot in simple mid-shots and the rare close-up, but there’s so much power and intense beauty in these shots. Our focus should solely be on these mothers and their children. Continue reading Sheffield Doc Fest Exclusive Review: Mother-Child (Niña mamá)

Review: Disclosure

“Disclosure” is a vital, near-perfect documentary on transgender representation in film and television that is one of the most singularly cathartic viewing experiences that I as a trans person have ever experienced. Sam Feder, along with every interviewee and participant in this production (including Laverne Cox, Chaz Bono and Angelica Ross) discuss trans issues with maturity and without feeling the need to spoon-feed the basics to cis audiences. This is a film that assuages all my fears that I ask too much of the world by wanting more media made BY trans people FOR trans people. Continue reading Review: Disclosure

Pride: A queer, socialist call-to-arms for 2020

As of writing, there are people of all ages and walks of life protesting systemic racism on the streets of the United Kingdom. There’s also a pandemic on, with many accusing the Tory government of exacerbating the UK’s horrifying death toll. So to say that “Pride” (2014) might have something to offer the average Brit right now is a bit of an understatement. Continue reading Pride: A queer, socialist call-to-arms for 2020

Editorial: White People, You Gotta Stop Watching “The Help”

Given that the systematic racism perpetuated against Black people is now in the forefront of the news, white people are trying to understand the insidiousness of racism in white society. It is not just the United States that is racist, though we elected a man who is blatant racist. The racism in the United Kingdom and Australia is also being noticed. But, given that George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, Ahmaud Arbery, and countless others were killed in the U.S., we are currently under a microscope. Continue reading Editorial: White People, You Gotta Stop Watching “The Help”

Review: Nevertheless

Year: 2020 Runtime: 80 Minutes Director: Sarah Moshman By Erica Richards “Nevertheless” hits the ground running at full speed and does not hold back. So, prepare and buckle up—otherwise you will be left in the dust. This is one of those documentaries that I passionately believe every person can benefit from watching and should watch, if you are able to. If for nothing else than … Continue reading Review: Nevertheless

“Marriage Story”: A Feminist Fairy Tale

“Marriage Story” is actually a tale about a divorce – that of two successful theatre artists, Charlie (Adam Driver) and Nicole (Scarlett Johansson). Initially, the film appears to be entirely Charlie’s story but without Nicole, there would be no movie. In the beginning, he is unable to see his wife for who she really is but he grows to see her so clearly that he can fully appreciate the extent of what he’s lost. That theme – of appreciating women as fully formed human beings, equal to their male partners and counterparts – is what makes “Marriage Story” a feminist love story. Continue reading “Marriage Story”: A Feminist Fairy Tale