In Their Own League Advent Calendar: 16. Lethal Weapon

By Joan Amenn Turns out there is more than one film that references Christmas with guns, explosions, mayhem and world weary but good-hearted cops. No not THAT one, we’re talking about “Lethal Weapon” (1987). The first of a very profitable series directed by Richard Donner, which is strangely also the name of one of Santa’s reindeer, “Lethal Weapon” certainly doesn’t skimp on its action scenes. … Continue reading In Their Own League Advent Calendar: 16. Lethal Weapon

Animated April, Retrospective Review: The Prince of Egypt

“The Prince of Egypt” is one of the greatest animated movies of all time. It has a captivating story, unforgettable music, and beautiful animation which appeals to all viewers, even if they don’t practice one of the religions that feature the story of Moses. This was writer and artist Brenda Chapman’s first film as a director as well as the first animated film featuring a woman director at a major studio. Chapman would later go on to be the first woman to win Best Animated Feature at the Oscars for “Brave” (2012). Continue reading Animated April, Retrospective Review: The Prince of Egypt

ITOL 2019 Round-Up: The Last Black Man In San Francisco

Many films in 2019 dealt with semi-autobiographical tales. Ageing directors wrote and/or directed stories which mirrored their lives. They looked at aspects of their own collective past and current present, giving us films like Martin Scorsese’s “The Irishman” and Pedro Almodovar’s “Pain and Glory”. Lulu Wang made us remember how much we love our grandmas in “The Farewell” and Shia LaBeouf showed us the specific and cathartic toll that acting and fatherhood can take on a person. 

None of these personal stories compare to the one told by longtime friends-turned-collaborators Joe Talbot and Jimmie Fails with “The Last Black Man in San Francisco”. Continue reading ITOL 2019 Round-Up: The Last Black Man In San Francisco