Exclusive Interview with Lisa Rovner, Director of “Sisters With Transistors”

“Sisters With Transistors” is the debut feature from French American director Lisa Rovner. The film was part of the official selection at this year’s Sheffield Documentary Film Festival as well as being part of the official selection at the SXSW Film Festival. The documentary tells the untold story of electronic music’s female pioneers, remarkable composers who embraced machines and their liberating technologies to utterly transform how we produce and listen to music today. Continue reading Exclusive Interview with Lisa Rovner, Director of “Sisters With Transistors”

Review: John Lewis: Good Trouble

The United States feels like it’s at another turning point in its social history. Rebelling against injustice and protesting for change are things built into its core. There could not be a more perfect time for a documentary like Dawn Porter’s “John Lewis: Good Trouble” (2020) to be released. For those unfamiliar with John Lewis, he’s a Congressman representing the state of Georgia, who is well known for his history of non-violent activism during the Civil Rights Movement of the 1950s and 60s and his particular dedication to voting rights. Continue reading Review: John Lewis: Good Trouble

Review: “Petite Fille” (“Little Girl”) #EdFilmFestAtHome

This intimate and charming documentary by French director Sébastien Lifshitz follows 7-year-old Sacha and her mother Karine. They battle for her Sacha’s acceptance as a trans girl, and for a normal childhood. With a focus on family, support and identity this is a heart-filled and compassionate film which shows audiences what life can be like for a trans child. Continue reading Review: “Petite Fille” (“Little Girl”) #EdFilmFestAtHome

Sheffield Doc Fest Exclusive Review: “Film About a Father Who”

Lynne Sachs’ documentaries are quite unlike anything else you will ever see. Poetic, impactful and moving journeys into unique worlds which are rarely captured on-screen whether it’s the hidden world of laundrettes in her film “The Washing Society” or the world of immigrants sharing a ‘shift-bed’ in “Your Day Is My Night”. Every film feels like it has a personal connection to Sachs, but it is perhaps her latest film, “Film About a Father Who” that is her most personal yet. Continue reading Sheffield Doc Fest Exclusive Review: “Film About a Father Who”

ITOL Top 15 Films of 2020 (So Far), Numbers 15-11

Gosh, isn’t 2020 over yet?! Wait, we’re only just over halfway through? *Sighs heavily and inhales deeply* Okay, okay…at least there’s only 178 days left of 2020. Anyway, picking our top 15 films of the year (so far) has been tough especially seeing how release dates of certain films have been delayed and how we’ve been trapped inside for months. However, the ITOL have come together to create our top 15 films from the last 6 months. Please let us know which films make your top 15 list and what films are you looking forward to catching later this year! Continue reading ITOL Top 15 Films of 2020 (So Far), Numbers 15-11

Sheffield Doc Fest Exclusive Review: The Kiosk (Le Kiosque)

In the world of the Kiosk, everything is within a 2-metre distance. It’s a small, cramped and confined world, certainly not one for those suffering from claustrophobia. We find ourselves in the world of the Kiosk, seeing it through the eyes of the young French filmmaker Alexandra Pianelli. The Kiosk has been in her family for four generations now, and we can see the history of this world around us. In the coin trays, we can see how the wood has been worn down after years of fingers rummaging around for the right change, “the fossils of our fingers” is the way that the director describes it to us. Previously Alexandra’s mother was the sole inhabitant of this world, but now Alexandra is experiencing it and we are with her every step of the way. Continue reading Sheffield Doc Fest Exclusive Review: The Kiosk (Le Kiosque)

Review: Kate Nash: Underestimate The Girl

Remember MySpace? Yeah, it barely registers on what it was anymore – yet that is where the world found Kate Nash or more to the point – where she found the world back in 2008. From this she essentially became what is commonly referred to as a ‘one-hit’ wonder – and all of it because of a broken leg suffered while working at Nando’s, a fantastically delicious chicken restaurant chain not known in the States. Continue reading Review: Kate Nash: Underestimate The Girl

Sheffield Doc Fest Exclusive Review: Judy Versus Capitalism

Just who is Judy Rebick? Well, it’s a complicated question to ask. Judy is a proud second-wave feminist from Canada, and has been an activist for women’s rights for over five decades. She’s the woman who saved abortionist Dr. Henry Morgentaler from being stabbed. She’s from a Jewish family but she’s a campaigner to free Palenstine. She’s the survivor of abuse, an eating disorder, and other mental health issues. And, she fights against the corruption of Capitalism. However, she’s fighting against so much more and she’s been fighting all her life. Judy is a lot of things, but mostly she’s just herself. Continue reading Sheffield Doc Fest Exclusive Review: Judy Versus Capitalism

Sheffield Doc Fest Exclusive Review: Mother-Child (Niña mamá)

Shot in black and white, “Mother-Child” is beautifully stark and honest. There are no fancy, dramatic camera angles. Instead, cinematographer Gustavo Schiaffino, makes the decisions to shoot in simple mid-shots and the rare close-up, but there’s so much power and intense beauty in these shots. Our focus should solely be on these mothers and their children. Continue reading Sheffield Doc Fest Exclusive Review: Mother-Child (Niña mamá)

Review: You Don’t Nomi

It would take a brave individual to take on the task of deconstructing “Showgirls” and examining whether it’s a masterpiece or just plain shit. That brave soul is director, Jeffrey McHale with the fascinating, captivating and absorbing documentary “You Don’t Nomi” (a nice pun as “Showgirls” main character is called Nomi). This is McHale’s first feature film, and frankly it’s brilliant! It doesn’t offer up a definite conclusion of whether or not “Showgirls” is a masterpiece on the scale of something like “Citizen Kane” nor is it simply a hit piece. Continue reading Review: You Don’t Nomi