In Their Own League Hall of Fame: Kira Muratova

Last year I attended a talk at the Edinburgh Film Festival regarding women in the film industry, and a filmmaker called Kira Muratova was discussed. This was a filmmaker I had never heard of before, and I made a note to research into her and her work once I returned back from the festival. Alas, until now, I didn’t hold that promise. Continue reading In Their Own League Hall of Fame: Kira Muratova

In Their Own League Hall of Fame: Louise Kolm-Fleck

The first woman to ever direct a movie was Alice Guy-Blaché. Then came Louise Kolm-Fleck. But there is a significant difference between the two. One has made her mark in the history books, is considered a milestone, and does ring a bell for even those not too familiar with female film history. The other one vanished into obscurity. One might argue, if she was “only” the second, maybe that’s why we don’t talk about her anymore? Continue reading In Their Own League Hall of Fame: Louise Kolm-Fleck

In Their Own League Hall of Fame: Nell Shipman

By Bianca Garner There’s a high chance that you haven’t heard of Nell Shipman. Like many pioneering female filmmakers of the silent cinema era, her name has become lost in time. So many of us who study film are aware of the ‘great’ film directors of this era: Cecil B. DeMille, Josef von Sternberg, Charlie Chaplin, Buster Keaton, and Erich von Stroheim. However, the achievements … Continue reading In Their Own League Hall of Fame: Nell Shipman

In Their Own League Hall of Fame: Dorothy Arzner

There are many great female directors who have broken barriers in the industry and paved the way for future generations. One of those women (who is often forgotten outside of academia) was Dorothy Arzner. She is the most prolific female director to date, was the first woman to direct a film with sound, and was the first female member of the Directors Guild of America. Continue reading In Their Own League Hall of Fame: Dorothy Arzner

Anna May Wong: The First Asian American Icon

Now if I asked most people, which actor was the trailblazer for Asian people on the worldwide stage (and I guess I mean Hollywood), I would wager most would come up with Bruce Lee. A few might even offer up Nancy Kwan. What if I told you that the breakthrough was not made in the 1970s by Lee, nor in the 1960s by Kwan, but … Continue reading Anna May Wong: The First Asian American Icon