A Look Back On Sally In The Nightmare Before Christmas

We love Jack Skellington for not staying in his lane, for that exuberance that makes this Pumpkin King of Halloween want to wrap himself in Christmas like a kid flopping into a snowdrift. But Sally, the clever ragdoll who first loves Jack from afar, gives "The Nightmare Before Christmas" a conscience and an extra dose of heart. Jack and Sally have been bridging two of the biggest holidays for more than 25 years now. Tim Burton, director of "Beetlejuice", "Batman", and "Edward Scissorhands", first conceived of the dapper skeleton with an existential crisis in the 1980s, writing a poem about a spooky fellow who wants more out of life than just saying, “Boo!” (A book version with Burton’s illustrations was released for the film’s twentieth anniversary.)

Sex and Living- Death in Thirst

2019 was the year that Andrew Scott’s Hot Priest seized the zeitgeist with full gusto. The Fleabag character had people all over the world fanning themselves to avoid a case of the vapours, with his actual name remaining a mystery. He was merely the latest - one of the most libidinously triumphant – in a line of on-screen hot priests. Others include Father Brian Finn in “Keeping the Faith”, Father Grandier in “The Devils”, Father Andrew Kiernan in “Stigmata”, Reverend Adam Smallbone in “Rev” and, perhaps most obviously, Friar Fuck in “Sex and the City”. One of the finest men of the faith was given to us by Park Chan-wook in his 2009 vampire romantic-horror, “Thirst”.

Halloween H20: Laurie Strode, the OG Scream Queen Getting Even this Halloween

It is tragic that this year’s Halloween season has seen barely any worthwhile horror shaking up the box office. Sure, Robert Eggers’ “The Lighthouse” is being released here and there, but if what I’ve seen on #FilmTwitter is anything to go by, the film is still quite inaccessible to quite a substantial amount of people. So, if like me, you’re spending your Halloween on the couch of a friend’s house, with some pumpkin spice--allow me to suggest you revisit Steve Miner's "Halloween: H20". Only two (arguably three) of the six “Halloween” films released prior to this are worthy of a recommendation. This film--set 20 years after the events of Laurie Strode (Jamie Lee Curtis) barely escaping the hospital with her life on that fateful Halloween night--seems to have capitalized on the cultural zeitgeist of the “Scream” films (also worthy of a Halloween slasher binge).

Ari Aster’s Hereditary and Midsommar Show us What it’s Like for Women to Grieve

"Hereditary" and "Midsommar", directed by Ari Aster, disguise a family drama and a relationship drama under the facade of horror. They demonstrate women’s grief during the most heinous of circumstances, as well as the agency that each protagonist has in facing that grief and finally achieving a sense of peace. Toni Collette and Florence Pugh give stellar performances as women absolving their grief through the most extreme means possible. In Hereditary, Annie (Toni Collette) faces the loss of her mother, Ellen (Kathleen Chalfant), and her thirteen-year-old daughter, Charlie (Molly Shapiro). Ellen dies of old age and Annie’s son, Peter (Alex Wolff), accidentally decapitates Charlie (Milly Shapiro) on their way to the hospital (Charlie has an allergic reaction to nuts).

31 Days of Horror, Day 10: Berlin Syndrome

Whilst passing through the German capital looking to get a taste of the city’s life, Australian traveler (Teresa Palmer) meets Andi (Max Riemelt), a charming Berliner and a holiday romance ensue. The morning after a night of intense passion the backpacker finds herself locked in the abandoned apartment. a locked front door is quickly revealed to be something more sinister than a simple mistake. In Cate Shortland’s Psychological-thriller “Berlin Syndrome” (2017) the stuff of tourist night terrors manifests in ways far worse than a lost passport or an S-Bahn fine.

A Final Girl Trope in Horror Films: Then and Now

She's fierce, polite, but will battle every guy in a mask. The beginning of the pop culture trope from the title started with Mari Collingwood in "The Last House on the Left" (1972). The phenomenon exists mainly in slasher films and refers to the main character, who is a female. It defines the last woman alive who is supposed to battle the serial killer and kill him. Often the final girl is a virgin. Always with excellent etiquette, she's also very friendly. A female character' trope introduced above is meant to survive everybody.

31 Days Horror, Day 7: Cargo

"Cargo" is a 2018 Australian post-apocalyptic horror film written by Yolanda Ramke who also co-directs the film with Ben Howling. The film follows an infected father who has just hours left before he becomes undead, and his desperate attempt to find for a new home for his infant child. The plot of "Cargo" may seem familiar to you as the film is based on Ramke and Howling’s short film also entitled "Cargo".

31 Days of Horror, Day 4: Honeymoon

By Kristy Strouse “Honeymoon” (2014) takes what should be one of the best moments of your life and ultimately makes it the worst. For contrast we’re first introduced to the leads of this limited cast: Bea (Rose Leslie) and Paul (Harry Treadaway) through their wedding video. They’re happy, telling stories about how they met and... Continue Reading →

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