Editorial: There Are More Female Directors Than Gerwig and Coppola (And We Need to Learn Their Names)

There was a recent post on Twitter asking for the film community to name a female filmmaker but not name famous directors Sofia Coppola or Greta Gerwig. Sure, people were able to name other directors. However, I was struck by the fact that there are truly so many women working behind the camera, but only a few are widely known by audiences. Continue reading Editorial: There Are More Female Directors Than Gerwig and Coppola (And We Need to Learn Their Names)

Exclusive Interview With Director Amy Adrion About “Half the Picture”

“Do you want to watch this with me?”  I am home for the holidays and my mom, a movie-buff, is gearing up to watch the documentary film, “Half the Picture” (2018).  “Half the Picture” looks at female filmmakers, their stories, their films, and more importantly, giving them the space to talk about the hurdles they have had to climb throughout their careers.  The filmmakers each had unique hurdles for their films, but the blatant gender inequality experienced was universal.  Thanks Mom for introducing me to this film.

“Half the Picture” was directed by female filmmaker, Amy Adrion. Adrion’s film perfectly balances the valiant victories and the lowest lows.  It is an intimate look at women in different stages of their careers, all with a plethora of film credits.  It ponders if the current conversations in film will lead to a paradigm shift or if this is simply a brief respite from systemic discrimination.  Will the current atmosphere lead to the change film and TV need?  It is an inspiring, and at times frustrating, film.  So much has been done, yet there remains so much to do. Continue reading Exclusive Interview With Director Amy Adrion About “Half the Picture”

Editorial: It Is Exhausting Trying to Find Myself in Cinema, And That’s a Problem

Do you remember the first time you saw yourself in a movie or television show?  Do you remember the feelings that go with it?  The shock of seeing your reflection.  The little guilt that comes with your weaknesses or faults.  The elation you feel seeing yourself.  And also the relief that there is at least one person in the world who sees you, authentically and unabashedly.

I find it difficult to have those moments.  The first film that ever struck me that way was 2010’s “Easy A.”  Emma Stone stars as precocious, intelligent, ego-centric teenager Olive, who thinks she can outsmart life and feelings.  I loved that film so much.  I still feel a bit of a high every time I see it.   Continue reading Editorial: It Is Exhausting Trying to Find Myself in Cinema, And That’s a Problem