Sundance 2022 Review: “When You Finish Saving the World”

Year: 2022 Runtime: 88 minutes Director and Writer: Jesse Eisenberg Stars: Julianne Moore, Finn Wolfhard, Billy Bryk, Alisha Boe, Jack Justice, Jay O. Sanders, Eleonore Hendricks By Morgan Roberts There is no way to sugarcoat the drawn out self-indulgence of “When You Finish Saving the World” (2022).  In many ways, it centers on two caricatures of the worst people possible: an extremely privileged white kid … Continue reading Sundance 2022 Review: “When You Finish Saving the World”

Review: Lisey’s Story, Episodes 1 &2

Year: 2021 Runtime: 60 minutes per episode Director: Pablo Larrain Writer: Stephen King (novel and screenplay) Actors: Julianne Moore, Joan Allen, Jennifer Jason Leigh, Clive Owen, Ron Cephas Jones, Dane DeHaan, Omar Metwally, Brian Hutchinson, Peter Scolari By Joan Amenn “Every marriage keeps its own secrets.” -Stephen King Premiering this weekend on Apple TV, Stephen King’s “Lisey’s Story” (2021) is adapted for the screen by … Continue reading Review: Lisey’s Story, Episodes 1 &2

Mental Health Awareness Month: Benny and Joon

“Benny and Joon” (1993) is an odd little concoction of a film. On one hand, it has its cuteness and quirk, and on the other- is a very serious example of one’s struggle with mental illness. Neither can be overlooked, nor appreciated without the other, throughout the course of the film. The melding of these makes it a charismatic picture.

Joon Pearl (Mary Stuart Masterson) and Benny Pearl (Aidan Quinn) are brother and sister. She’s an artist, he’s a mechanic, and he looks after her as her mental illness keeps her from living on her own. They have their own rhythm, and there is safety and harmony in their shared life, but it’s obvious both want more. Continue reading Mental Health Awareness Month: Benny and Joon

Review: “Blindness” or how not to deal with an outbreak

Fernando Meirelles’ 2008 film “Blindness” is a thriller which shows us exactly how not to deal with an outbreak.

When people across a major American city start to suddenly lose their sight it quickly becomes apparent that whatever is causing this is contagious. With no other symptoms the sufferers are rounded up and put into quarantine. They have no contact with the outside world and are simply locked up in isolation with no doctors, no support and only meagre rations.

The eye doctor who saw some of the earlier patients (Mark Ruffalo) is taken in and his wife (Julianne Moore) wants to stay with him so claims to be blind too. Continue reading Review: “Blindness” or how not to deal with an outbreak

ITOL Top 50 Films of the Decade, Entry No. 42: The Kids Are All Right

Year: 2010 Runtime: 106 Minutes Director: Lisa Cholodenoko Writer: Lisa Cholodenoko & Stuart Blumberg Stars: Annette Bening, Julianne Moore, Mia Wasikowska, Josh Hutcherson, Mark Ruffalo By Caz Armstrong “The Kids Are All Right” (2010), directed and co-written by Lisa Cholodenoko, is an expertly acted comedy-drama with complex emotions and a backdrop of a lesbian relationship. It was one of the first mainstream films to show … Continue reading ITOL Top 50 Films of the Decade, Entry No. 42: The Kids Are All Right

31 Days of Horror, Day 5: Carrie (2013)

Brian De Palma’s “Carrie” (1976) is such a staple of American horror that any director (regardless of their gender) would have had trouble trying to step into De Palma’s shoes. When it was first announced that there would be a remake of Stephen King’s Carrie, many of us held our breath. However, director Kimberly Peirce (“Boys Don’t Cry”) manages to pull off this challenge and modernizes the text for a Generation Y audience who have been brought up on a diet of social media and the internet. Stepping into the prom shoes of Sissy Spacek is Chloe Grace Moretz who delivers a decent performance, making her version of Carrie a lot more likable and relatable. Moretz’s Carrie has a unique vulnerability to her performance and we see the pain she is going through captured in her wide eyes. Continue reading 31 Days of Horror, Day 5: Carrie (2013)