Spotlight for Pride Month: Rickie Vasquez From “My So-Called Life”

By Morgan Roberts When “My So-Called Life” first premiered in 1994, it came across as a standard teen drama. However, the series, which introduced the world to the likes of Claire Danes and Jared Leto.  And while the series was groundbreaking in many ways, the character of Rickie Vasquez played by Wilson Cruz. Even being introduced to the show a decade after its original airdate, … Continue reading Spotlight for Pride Month: Rickie Vasquez From “My So-Called Life”

LGBT+ Filmmakers & Where to Stream Them

The LGBT+ community has been contributing to the film industry since the industry’s beginnings. Despite this, it is uncommon to find LGBT+ people receiving recognition for their work behind the camera. I’ve compiled a selection of currently available movies with LGBT+ directors, writers, composers/lyricists and where they can be streamed. It’s by no means an end all be all list of the greatest LGBT+ contributions to cinema, so I’m sorry if I’ve left of anyone’s favorites… This is just a place to start. Continue reading LGBT+ Filmmakers & Where to Stream Them

Lana Winters of “American Horror Story” and The Issues of the 60s’ Homosexuality, Abortion, and Adoption

In pop culture, especially in film and television discourse, we meet characters that mean a lot to us. They have an immense power to shape and shift our minds and, often, change our views. We look up to them and cheer them on in their struggles presented in a film or a series.

That character for me is Lana Winters portrayed by outstanding Sarah Paulson. The character is many things – a famous journalist, a lesbian, and a fearless woman introduced in the second season of “American Horror Story: Asylum.” Continue reading Lana Winters of “American Horror Story” and The Issues of the 60s’ Homosexuality, Abortion, and Adoption

“That Flooding Rush:” the Ebb and Flow of Below Her Mouth

James Joyce’s final chapter of Ulysses — a wonderfully difficult piece of fiction from the early twentieth century — features the wave-like storytelling, the continual up and down, that Joyce thought mirrored the April Mullenfemale orgasm. It is told in the thoughts and feelings of Molly Bloom, finishing this eighteen-chapter saga as a woman’s story. Continue reading “That Flooding Rush:” the Ebb and Flow of Below Her Mouth

Pride Month, Retrospective Review: Tell It to the Bees

Have you ever encountered a film in which its ending spoils everything about the viewing experience for you? Well, this was my experience watching “Tell It to the Bees” a film which I enjoyed a good proportion of the first and second act, only to have my investment and enjoyment of the film be completely ruined by its final act. Matters were made worse when I read up on the book and how drastically the film’s end differs compared to the actual book’s ending. Continue reading Pride Month, Retrospective Review: Tell It to the Bees

Pride Month, Retrospective Review: Brokeback Mountain

Sometimes the notion of a “forbidden romance” in films seems tantalizing, but other times… it’s just heartbreaking. It’s really dependent on the forces keeping these two people apart. With “Brokeback Mountain,” (2005) a beautifully heart-wrenching film, it’s tragic. It’s only “forbidden” because the two don’t think they can or sometimes, should, be together. Which is what makes it so inherently effective. No matter how many times I see this movie, it always finds its mark: right through the heart. Continue reading Pride Month, Retrospective Review: Brokeback Mountain

Review: A Secret Love

“Are you still holding out?” a man asks, seated across from his husband. Terry Donahue and Pat Henschel sit opposite the men and laugh in response. Despite being together for over sixty-five years, Pat has some hesitations about getting married. Those hesitations along with the couples’ life story are the subject of “A Secret Love” (2020).  Continue reading Review: A Secret Love

Social Isolation Review: “Bonding”

Sex is a little taboo.  I mean, for some, it is a lot of taboo. Coming to terms with understanding sex and sexuality is tackled in Rightor Doyle’s short-form comedy series “Bonding.”  Pete (Brendan Scannell) reconnects with his hometown friend Tiff (Zoe Levin) after they both move out to NYC.  Pete is gay and coming to terms with what his version of love, relationships, and sex all mean.  But he won’t be able to do any of that if he can’t pay his rent. That is where Tiff comes in. Continue reading Social Isolation Review: “Bonding”

SXSW Exclusive Review: The Carnivores

Writer/director Caleb Johnson’s sophomore effort, “The Carnivores”, has a lot of strong intrigue, allure, and character to entrance viewers into its strange story of how man’s best friend is dividing a couple and making one of them oddly obsessed with raw meat.

The film follows Alice (Tallie Medel) and Brett (Lindsay Burdge) as they are divided by Brett’s dog Harvie as his illness is causing him to slowly die. Although Brett wants to spend every last second with him since she feels she has so much history with him, Alice feels like he’s ruining everything. With Brett pretty much being obsessed with Harvie, Alice is starting to feel left out and it’s causing a major rift in their intimacy and love for one another. However, after Alice’s sleepwalking and her issues with Harvie come to a head, Harvie goes missing and the two women begin to uncover strange, beautiful, and even horrifying parts of one another. Continue reading SXSW Exclusive Review: The Carnivores