Film Review: Get Duked!

Three unruly delinquents Dean, Duncan and DJ Beatroot (Rian Gordon, Lewis Gribben and Viraj Juneja) led by teacher Mr. Carlyle (Jonathan Aris) are brought to the Scottish Highlands to redeem themselves after a lifetime of shenanigans and sabotage. They are to go on the Duke of Edinburgh Trek alongside Ian (Samuel Bottomley), a sincere overachiever to learn teamwork, leadership and orientation. Little do the four know is that the elements of the environment are not the only things that will stand in their way. Continue reading Film Review: Get Duked!

Review: She Dies Tomorrow

What would you do if  I told you that today was your last day on this planet? Would your galvanized restlessness motivate you to spend every waking moment with the most accessible loved one? Would you, in a state of fear, find the closest possible place to go skydiving? Would you suddenly become religious and confess all your sins to a priest–or would you do the alternative and regurgitate every mistake you’ve ever made with a glass of Cabernet Sauvignon in hand? Continue reading Review: She Dies Tomorrow

Review: The Rifleman (Blizzard of Souls)

Based on the novel “Blizzard of Souls” by Aleksandrs Grins, the film follows Arturs (Oto Brantevics) – a young Latvian boy that joins the Imperial Russian Army after his mother is killed by German soldiers during WWI. Alongside his father (Martins Vilsons), a high ranking officer, his brother (Raimonds Celms), and hundreds of soldiers, Arturs witnesses the horrors and griminess of warfare as they continuous fight the Germans – both day and night as well as through a harsh winter. Drudging through every slow-burning battle in the trenches and trying to make his father and brother proud, Arturs attempts to leave the battlefield as intact as possible and not be disillusioned as the ranks in the Russian Army start to crumble. Continue reading Review: The Rifleman (Blizzard of Souls)

Review: “Yes God Yes”

“Yes, God, Yes” is Karen Maine’s semi-autobiographical debut feature film, Maine is best known for being the co-writer of “Obvious Child”. She certainly likes to tackle taboo subject matters and blend them within the comedy genre. In “Yes, God, Yes” Maine explores the story of Sixteen-year-old Alice (Natalia Dyer) who is a devout Catholic. But when an AOL chat turns racy, she discovers masturbation and becomes guilt-ridden. Seeking redemption, she attends a mysterious religious retreat to try and suppress her urges, easier said than done. Things become heated when she meets the very cute Chris (Wolfgang Novogratz) who starts flirting with her. Over the course of four days all kinds of hijacks arise, which sees Alice discovering new secrets that she must fight to keep. Continue reading Review: “Yes God Yes”

Exclusive Interview with Stacy Martin, Actress from “Archive”

You may recognise the name Stacy Martin, she’s a talented young actress who has starred in films such as “Nymphomaniac: Vol. I” (2013), “High Rise (2015), “All the Money in the World” (2017)and one of my personal favourite films of 2018 “Vox Lux”. Martin’s most recent role is perhaps one of her most challenging yet, playing the character of Jules, a robot called J3 and providing the voice for another A.I. in Gavin’s Rothery’s “Archive”. However, this is a challenge that Martin is more than willing and capable of undertaking. On behalf of ITOL I managed to catch up with her to discuss the challenges of playing a robot, what attracted her to the role and what draws her to play such complex characters. Continue reading Exclusive Interview with Stacy Martin, Actress from “Archive”

Exclusive Interview with Gavin Rothery, Director of “Archive”

“Archive” is the feature debut from writer/director Gavin Rothery. It’s a complex, through-provoking and intelligent sci-fi film which features great performances by Theo James and Stacy Martin. Set in 2038, “Archive” tells the story of George Almore (James) who is working on a true human-equivalent AI. His latest prototype is almost ready, and his end goal is to be reunited with his dead wife (Martin).

What’s unique about the film is how it focuses on the themes of replacement and jealousy as well as proposing the question, “how would an A.I. react if it became sentient?”. ITOL editor Bianca Garner caught up with Gavin to speak about “Archive” and the role of a problematic computer played in the inception of the story. Continue reading Exclusive Interview with Gavin Rothery, Director of “Archive”

Review: Archive

“Archive” is the feature debut film from writer/director Gavin Rothery, a name you may recognise from his work on the Duncan Jones sci-fi film “Moon” as well as his concept art for several big named video games. Rothery has an eye for detail and a passion for world building, and we certainly see this on full display in “Archive”, a film so immersive and dense in detail that you can’t help but allow yourself to become pulled into this world. Continue reading Review: Archive

ITOL Top 15 Films of 2020 (So Far), Numbers 5-1

Phew! We’ve finally reached numbers 5 through 1. We hope you like our picks and maybe seek out the films that you haven’t yet seen. You can find numbers 15-11 here and numbers 10-6 here. Please let us know which films make your top 15 list and what films are you looking forward to catching later this year! A massive thank you to all the ITOL writers who contributed and voted. Here’s hoping the rest of 2020 won’t be so eventful! Continue reading ITOL Top 15 Films of 2020 (So Far), Numbers 5-1

Review: “Becky” is a Gory Revenge Thriller

When you join “Home Alone” and “Die Hard” together, then blend it with the gore of “Kill Bill,” you may just create something exciting and bloody as hell. The newest creation from Cary Murnion and Jonathan Millot tried it and directed a spunky film where Lulu Wilson shines brighter and scares more than Kevin James as a neo-nazi. Yes, I just said that. Continue reading Review: “Becky” is a Gory Revenge Thriller