Review: Rebecca

“Rebecca” could be ripe for a modern interpretation. For the uninitiated, the title takes its name from Rebecca de Winter, the late wife of aristocrat Maxim de Winter (Laurence Olivier in the Hitchcock version). Rebecca dies before the novel opens; yet she’s a strong presence throughout the book. She’s as much a character as Manderley, the manor where Maxim brings his new bride (Joan Fontaine in the Hitchcock film) after a whirlwind romance. The new Mrs. de Winter is gawky where Rebecca was glamorous and refined and feels herself paling by comparison, especially under the withering gaze and comments of the head housekeeper, Mrs. Danvers. Continue reading Review: Rebecca

Review: Monochrome: the Chromism

While the film tries very hard to build suspense, there is too much exposition and not enough action. We meet the main characters and learn of their relationships to each other in the broadest terms and that is pretty much the entire film. A news reporter (Shashana Pearson) does her best to warn of impending doom but the tension never really ratchets up. The camera is repeatedly thrown out of focus when various characters are either physically or emotionally in crisis and this becomes a distraction. The acting is simply not strong enough to make us care for these people, whether they are facing the apocalypse or are oddly blending into Technicolor in addition to that. “Monochrome: the Chromism” may grow into a more solid story in future episodes but for now, it might be best to wait to see the whole series to get a clearer understanding of the plot. Continue reading Review: Monochrome: the Chromism

Review: The Owners

Tell me if this sounds familiar: a group of four lowlifes want to make some easy money. A mansion owned by an elderly couple; a doctor and his wife is the only thing that stands in the way of the promise of mountains of cash and a secure future. So, the band of wankers break into the house while gram and gramps are out, only to discover that their nonexistent plan has backfired–one thing leads to another, and the tables have turned. Continue reading Review: The Owners

Review: She Dies Tomorrow

What would you do if  I told you that today was your last day on this planet? Would your galvanized restlessness motivate you to spend every waking moment with the most accessible loved one? Would you, in a state of fear, find the closest possible place to go skydiving? Would you suddenly become religious and confess all your sins to a priest–or would you do the alternative and regurgitate every mistake you’ve ever made with a glass of Cabernet Sauvignon in hand? Continue reading Review: She Dies Tomorrow

Review: The Rifleman (Blizzard of Souls)

Based on the novel “Blizzard of Souls” by Aleksandrs Grins, the film follows Arturs (Oto Brantevics) – a young Latvian boy that joins the Imperial Russian Army after his mother is killed by German soldiers during WWI. Alongside his father (Martins Vilsons), a high ranking officer, his brother (Raimonds Celms), and hundreds of soldiers, Arturs witnesses the horrors and griminess of warfare as they continuous fight the Germans – both day and night as well as through a harsh winter. Drudging through every slow-burning battle in the trenches and trying to make his father and brother proud, Arturs attempts to leave the battlefield as intact as possible and not be disillusioned as the ranks in the Russian Army start to crumble. Continue reading Review: The Rifleman (Blizzard of Souls)

Review: Chemical Hearts

Austin Abrams stars as Henry Page, a high school student who seems to be rather content with his outlook on life in wanting to go into a good university and have a bright future like his parents (played by Bruce Altman and Meg Gibson). Like his outgoing parents, he considers himself to be idealistic in terms of finding love. In other words, the dreaded term, being a “hopeless romantic.” Continue reading Review: Chemical Hearts

Review: Spinster

In “Spinster” (2020), Chelsea Peretti takes the leading role in a not-so-romantic comedy for the first time. Known for her role as Gina Linetti on “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” and her stand-up special “One of the Greats”, Peretti’s comedic delivery and deadpan tone are her trademarks. She shows an emotional depth paired with her classic comedic performance in “Spinster,” carrying the charming film from start to finish.  Continue reading Review: Spinster

Review: Liza, Liza, Skies Are Grey

An eclectic mix of techniques and inspirations, ‘Liza, Liza, Skies Are Grey’ bloats itself despite having the necessary components for a superb film of its own volition. Sander’s script is more concerned with emulating a neo-Romeo & Juliet than forging a path for these characters under their autonomy, resulting in an engaging film which stumbles along the path where it should be gliding. Continue reading Review: Liza, Liza, Skies Are Grey

Review: Fisherman’s Friends

Take any charming music film from the UK and blend it with an unconventional romantic comedy and that’s “Fisherman’s Friends”. It fits right in with films like “Once” (2007) and “Sing Street” (2016). “Fisherman’s Friends” tells the story of city boy, big shot music executive Danny (Daniel Mays) who is visiting a small village in Cornwall with his friends on his way to a wedding. Continue reading Review: Fisherman’s Friends