Mental Health Awareness Month Review: “Christine”

I remember watching “Christine” (2016) the first time.  I went into the film knowing nothing about Christine Chubbuck or her life.  I knew minimal about broadcast journalism in the 1970s.  But watching the film was an eye-opening and haunting experience.

The real life Christine Chubbuck is not a household name. She was a television reporter in the Sarasota, Florida area, and worked on human stories; finding interest in the seemingly mundane about people. But in the 1970s, the world was shifting from feel-good news pieces to the mentality of “If it bleeds, it leads.” The 1970s is when we saw the rise of the Vietnam War, and serial killers dominated headlines. There was a paradigm shift and Chubbuck was not ready.  Sure, she was interested in politics and asking tough questions, but she was intrigued with others, how they operated and what made them tick. Continue reading Mental Health Awareness Month Review: “Christine”

Editorial: It Is Exhausting Trying to Find Myself in Cinema, And That’s a Problem

Do you remember the first time you saw yourself in a movie or television show?  Do you remember the feelings that go with it?  The shock of seeing your reflection.  The little guilt that comes with your weaknesses or faults.  The elation you feel seeing yourself.  And also the relief that there is at least one person in the world who sees you, authentically and unabashedly.

I find it difficult to have those moments.  The first film that ever struck me that way was 2010’s “Easy A.”  Emma Stone stars as precocious, intelligent, ego-centric teenager Olive, who thinks she can outsmart life and feelings.  I loved that film so much.  I still feel a bit of a high every time I see it.   Continue reading Editorial: It Is Exhausting Trying to Find Myself in Cinema, And That’s a Problem

We Need to Talk About the Gay Stuff in IT: Chapter Two

“IT: Chapter Two” (2019) has been talked about a lot since its still fairly recent release, and the internet has already gone through multiple modes of discourse on its queer representation. The first consisted of people posting extremely necessary content warnings for the film’s opening scene, which features a violent homophobic hate crime. The second occurred when many people took to Twitter to mock a recent Out article which labeled the character of Pennywise “homophobic”. Continue reading We Need to Talk About the Gay Stuff in IT: Chapter Two