Review: Fall

Year: 2022 Runtime: 107 minutes Director: Scott Mann Writers: Jonathan Frank, Scott Mann Actors: Grace Caroline Currey, Virginia Gardner, Mason Gooding, Jeffrey Dean Morgan, Jasper Cole, Darrell Dennis, Bamm Ericsen, Julia Pace Mitchell By Caelyn O’Reilly When I first saw the trailer for “Fall” I got so excited to see the latest entry in my favourite hyper-specific genre of film; thrillers about extremely competent women … Continue reading Review: Fall

The Aviary Review

We’re in the middle of nowhere with two women who seem to be fleeing somewhere and someone, as quickly as possible. The two women seem to know each other but they’re not particularly close. It’s as if their fates have been entwined because of their circumstances. The older of the two, Jillian (Malin Akerman) has a sense of authority to her. She’s clearly the one who has planned their escape, and is the most prepared and experienced for their journey in the barren landscape of the New Mexico desert. Blair (Lorenzo Izzo) on the other hand, is relying heavily on Jillian, placing all of her trust into the other woman. Quickly, we discover the reason for their night-time flight, they’re fleeing a cult known as “Skylight” which is run by the mysterious and ominous, Seth (Chris Messina). Continue reading The Aviary Review

Film Review: Fever Dream

Year: 2021 Runtime: 93 minutes Director: Claudia Llosa Writer: Claudia Llosa (screenplay), Samanta Schweblin (based on the novel by) Actors: Maria Valverde, Guillermina Sorribes Liotta, Dolores Fonzi, Emilio Vodanovich By Tom Moore The latest film from writer/director Claudia Llosa, an adaptation of Samanta Schweblin’s 2014 novel “Fever Dream”, is an impactful story of motherhood and environmental disaster that lives up to its name. “Fever Dream” … Continue reading Film Review: Fever Dream

TIFF 2021 Review: The Guilty

Year: 2021 Runtime: 90 Minutes Director: Antoine Fuqua Writer(s): Nic Pizzolatto (screenplay), Gustav Moller (based on original by), Emil Nygaard Albertsen (based on original by) Stars: Jake Gyllenhaal, Riley Keough, Eli Goree, Ethan Hawke, Peter Sarsgaard Antoine Fuqua is quickly becoming a writer/director that needs no introduction with the high-level thrills he delivers with films like “Training Day,” “Southpaw”, and both “Equalizer” films, but his … Continue reading TIFF 2021 Review: The Guilty

NIGHTSTREAM Review: The Doorman

Kitamura is the kind of director that’s had his hands in a bunch of different properties and genres. He’s gone into the depths of bloody and brutal horror, been behind a Godzilla movie with “Godzilla: Final Wars”, taken on plenty of action flicks, and even did a live-action adaptation of “Lupin the 3rd”. He’s a director whose mark might be subtle, but it definitely doesn’t go unnoticed and it’s why it’s baffling how “The Doorman” ended up being so bland. The film’s story of a former Marine named Ali (Rose) becoming hotel doorman in New York City after a traumatic combat experience and being forced to protect a family after a group of thieves break into the hotel isn’t all that unfamiliar. Honestly, the whole idea of action stars protecting families has been seen in both adult action flicks like “The Transporter” series and family-friendly films like “The Pacifier”. “The Doorman” is the epidemy of these kind of films as it brings nothing to set itself apart. Continue reading NIGHTSTREAM Review: The Doorman

Film Review: The Lie

Being stuck on the shelf since it debuted at Toronto Film Festival back in 2018, Blumhouse has finally decided to let the latest film from writer/director Veena Sud, “The Lie”, loose through a multi-film deal with Amazon. The film, a remake of the German film “We Monsters”, follows parents Jay (Peter Sarsgaard) and Rebecca (Mireille Enos) as their love for their daughter Kayla (Joey King) after she makes a lethal mistake. “The Lie” is essentially the same kind of story we’ve seen in stuff like “Defending Jacob” – a teenager is suspected of doing something wrong, usually murder, and the parents are forced to do everything in their power to prove their innocence and keep them safe. It’s a test of how far parents are willing to go to protect their kids when they’re suspected of something that could put their entire life in jeopardy. Continue reading Film Review: The Lie

NiGHTSTREAM Review: Black Bear

One of the strongest and most compelling elements of “Black Bear” is Plaza’s performance as she truly commands the screen with Allison’s controlling personality. She’s clearly comes with a purpose that she’s keeping hidden to herself and although she’s never exactly truthful with what she’s saying, Plaza constantly piques your curiosity just to keep you wondering what’s true and what’s not. Allison is also a huge provocateur, at least in the first half of the film, as she elevates issues between Blair and Gabe by throwing opinions out there and trying to back pedal out of it. Even for her causing a rift between these two likely for the sake of some dramatic inspiration, there’s still a distinct charm that Plaza brings to the character that keeps you invested and intrigued by everything she does. Continue reading NiGHTSTREAM Review: Black Bear

NightStream Film Festival Review: “Run”

Year: 2020 Runtime: 90 minutes Director: Aneesh Chaganty Writers: Aneesh Chaganty, Sev Ohanian Stars: Kiera Allen, Sarah Paulson By Tom Moore After breaking onto the film scene in 2018 with “Searching,” a stylized and intricate webcam thriller filled with unique twists and turns, writer/director Aneesh Chaganty left audiences eager to see what he’d do next. “Run,” which makes its world premiere at NIGHTSTREAM, a virtual … Continue reading NightStream Film Festival Review: “Run”

Fantasia Festival Review: The Oak Room

Taking viewers to the grim Canadian backwoods for some tense bar talk, director Cody Calahan and writer Peter Genoway come together to create a killer thriller with “The Oak Room”.

Set against the backdrop of a frigid blizzard, the film follows an even colder relationship as Stevie (RJ Mitte) returns home after being a drifter for some time in order to collect the remains of his father (Nicolas Campbell) from an angry bartender named Paul (Peter Outerbridge). Paul was best friends with Stevie’s father, Gordon, and was forced to take care of his funeral arrangements and cremation since Stevie was out “drifting” and never came back for the funeral. Even worse is that Stevie can only repay the major debt that he owes to Paul with a story. So, as he starts to tell his story about two men at a bar called “The Oak Room”, the details and meaning of the story start to resonate with Paul in a way that turns the night into a dark tale of mistrust that leads to shocking and violent conclusions. Continue reading Fantasia Festival Review: The Oak Room