Tribeca Film Festival 2021 Review: No Ordinary Life

Year: 2021 Runtime: 77 minutes Director: Heather O’Neill By Joan Amenn The organization “Reporters Without Borders” states that 50 journalists were killed in their line of work in 2020, 84% of which were deliberately targeted. Although not a very large number, it is important to keep in mind that while journalism has inherent risks as a profession, journalists and their news crews are increasingly being … Continue reading Tribeca Film Festival 2021 Review: No Ordinary Life

Tribeca Film Festival 2021 Review: 12 Mighty Orphans

There’s no sport movies love to romanticize and showcase as a pivotal component in coming together to overcome seemingly impossible odds more than American Football. Whether its overcoming racial divide, rough upbringings, terrible tragedy, or just wanting to see that obnoxious rich football team lose to the raggedy underdogs, football is mostly the sport of choice it seems. This film definitely falls into that same bucket of films like “Gridiron Gang” (2006), “We Are Marshall”(2006), or whichever one you favor as it tells the story, based around Jim Dent’s novel, of devoted high school coach Rusty Russell (Luke Wilson) leading a ragtag group of orphans to become one of the top football teams in Fort Worth, Texas during the Great Depression. Continue reading Tribeca Film Festival 2021 Review: 12 Mighty Orphans

Tribeca Film Festival 2021: Wolfgang

Wolfgang Puck is unquestionable a great innovator and exquisitely trained in the classic French tradition but he also represents the excessive marketing of “celebrity chefs” that have become a plague on cable television. Decades ago, he came to America looking for work as a somewhat insecure young man with something to prove. Director David Gelb, who is best known for “Jiro Dreams of Sushi” (2011), seems to want to make the case that all Puck ever wanted was the love he never got from his abusive stepfather. An empire of restaurants, packaged prepared foods with his name on them, TV appearances and at least half a dozen cookbooks all point to a fiercely focused perfectionist driven to make up for childhood trauma. Continue reading Tribeca Film Festival 2021: Wolfgang

Tribeca Film Festival 2021 Review: No Man of God

ersonally, I’m getting tapped out on Ted Bundy stories. At this point, there have been so many movies, documentaries, and tv series on the prolific serial killer that there really aren’t many unique angles left to cover. However, Sealy ends up slightly finding one in touching on the last days of Bundy (Luke Kirby) on Death Row as he gets interviewed by FBI analyst Bill Hagmaier (Elijah Wood) in order help build a profile on serial killers. As the two begin to talk more and more Bill finds himself going deeper down the rabbit hole and having philosophical and psychological boundaries be crossed. Continue reading Tribeca Film Festival 2021 Review: No Man of God